The Nancy Hank was built in 1911 and was primarily used as a mail carrier. Driver Bill Schultz says she would turn over every day with one crank! He had driven this car for 14 years, 313 days per year and about 10 miles per day. He was told that she was driven from coast to coast before he got to start driving her. The Nancy Hank has the same motor, transmission, axles,wheels, frame, and all other parts that she had when she was built.

The Nancy Hank was built in 1911 and was primarily used as a mail carrier. Driver Bill Schultz says she would turn over every day with one crank! He had driven this car for 14 years, 313 days per year and about 10 miles per day. He was told that she was driven from coast to coast before he got to start driving her. The Nancy Hank has the same motor, transmission, axles,wheels, frame, and all other parts that she had when she was built.

The FWD Corporation raced in the Indianapolis 500 races from 1932 to 1937.

The FWD Corporation raced in the Indianapolis 500 races from 1932 to 1937.

FWD is now know as Seagrave, mainly building firetrucks in Clintonville, WI. This is an early Seagrave Firetruck built in 1916.

FWD is now know as Seagrave, mainly building firetrucks in Clintonville, WI. This is an early Seagrave Firetruck built in 1916.

This is an early photo of the workforce employed at FWD. This building is still in use and is adjacent to the new Seagrave facility in Clintonville,WI, only several blocks from the FWD Foundation Museum.

This is an early photo of the workforce employed at FWD. This building is still in use and is adjacent to the new Seagrave facility in Clintonville,WI, only several blocks from the FWD Foundation Museum.

The Four Wheel Drive Battleship

Dubbed the "Battleship" because of its amazing traction and ability to go where no car could go, this 1909 Badger-FWD is generally regarded as the first four wheel drive motor car in America. It is the first of 10 such cars and chassis built during the years 1909-1910-1911 byThe Four Wheel Drive Auto Company, now FWD Corporation, of Clintonvile, Wisconsin.

The Four Wheel Drive Battleship

Dubbed the "Battleship" because of its amazing traction and ability to go where no car could go, this 1909 Badger-FWD is generally regarded as the first four wheel drive motor car in America. It is the first of 10 such cars and chassis built during the years 1909-1910-1911 byThe Four Wheel Drive Auto Company, now FWD Corporation, of Clintonvile, Wisconsin.

A very early snowmobile designed by the FWD auto company.

A very early snowmobile designed by the FWD auto company.

1916 Seagrave Firetruck.

1916 Seagrave Firetruck.

Dsc00611
The Model B Ammunition Carrier 

One of the trucks most remembered by veterans of World War I is this 3 ton, four wheel drive Ammunition Carrier built by the Four Wheel Drive Auto Company.  More than 20,000 of these famed Model "B's," as they were called, hustled guns, ammunition, troops and supplies to the battle fronts in the service of U.S. and allied fighting forces. After the war, some 5,000 surplus "B's" distributed to the newly formed State Highway Departments became the nucleus of the first highway and road maintenance fleets in America. Thirty five years after the war, in 1955, one of these units in full battlefield camouflage was used as a featured attraction of a nationwide travelling truck show sponsored by the FWD Company. Servicemen from coast to coast, as well as reporters from T.V., radio, and the press, greeted the famed "Buddy of World War I" at every stop along its tour. In 1919, four of these trucks, taken from the battlefields, were place on exhibit in the British Imperial War Museum in London's great Crystal Palace. They were the only American made trucks so honored by the British Government. A year later, in 1920, the U.S. War Department placed a scale model of the "Ammunition Carrier" on permanent exhibit in the Smithsonian Institution in Washington, D.C.  Each year hundreds of people visit the FWD Museum and Historical building at Clintonville to see this original truck and other vehicles of ancient vintage which have been preserved as show pieces by the FWD Company.

The Model B Ammunition Carrier

One of the trucks most remembered by veterans of World War I is this 3 ton, four wheel drive Ammunition Carrier built by the Four Wheel Drive Auto Company. More than 20,000 of these famed Model "B's," as they were called, hustled guns, ammunition, troops and supplies to the battle fronts in the service of U.S. and allied fighting forces. After the war, some 5,000 surplus "B's" distributed to the newly formed State Highway Departments became the nucleus of the first highway and road maintenance fleets in America. Thirty five years after the war, in 1955, one of these units in full battlefield camouflage was used as a featured attraction of a nationwide travelling truck show sponsored by the FWD Company. Servicemen from coast to coast, as well as reporters from T.V., radio, and the press, greeted the famed "Buddy of World War I" at every stop along its tour. In 1919, four of these trucks, taken from the battlefields, were place on exhibit in the British Imperial War Museum in London's great Crystal Palace. They were the only American made trucks so honored by the British Government. A year later, in 1920, the U.S. War Department placed a scale model of the "Ammunition Carrier" on permanent exhibit in the Smithsonian Institution in Washington, D.C. Each year hundreds of people visit the FWD Museum and Historical building at Clintonville to see this original truck and other vehicles of ancient vintage which have been preserved as show pieces by the FWD Company.

To view a larger photo of the above vehicles, click on the thumbnails below.